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their heads. if people are better educated about these issues they will call the people on the carpet and say wait a minute. i think the mission, if i can give you that, would be to step outside your circle, your work circle and bring this issue to the broader public so they can create a change in the culture and the public's response to these issues that will then enable the politicians and legislators to make the reforms to the finances and the court's etc that really need to happen and one way i think is a good way to do that and i'm talking, i'm a journalist, an advocacy journalist, it's usually said with a sneer but i wear the badge proudly, to reach out to reporter's because of course they do have that soapbox to share these stories with. so reach out to reporter's in your local newspapers, crime reporter's, whoever, and just invite them to spend the day with you. invite them to spend a day looking at just a day in your life as a public defender, a day in the life of you as a parole officer, whatever it is. and it's a tradition journalist use a lot with cops. we do a police ride along.
we do not have. senator kerry was talking earlier about the excellence in u.s. higher education, how that has always helped us, training more and better engineers, but those days are ending. so our natural design advantages are going to be harder to come by going forward. and so we need those things, so we are not starting with a 10% cost disadvantage. >> in asia. what would it mean for caterpillar? >> we have a huge business in asia and growing. that is the single largest opportunity over the next decade or so. we intend to lead market. but again, i come back to the point that it is likely that a lot of those countries, a number of those, will do agreements with or without us. if we don't get tpp done. we will look into a market that we ought to be competing with. i'll move to africa because i am passionate about this. we watched the chinese really take over africa. they've come in with their own financing, their own engineering, sometimes their own workers to take over minerals, extraction, oil and gas, hydroelectric power across africa. i know, michael, that is on your agenda. but
our country who are trying to save for their retirements, save for their children's college education, saving for their first home, are not harmed by confusing, costly regulations coming out of washington. mr. speaker, all americans know that a flood -- a flood -- of shington red tape has hurt our economy. that's why tens of millions of our fellow countrymen remain unemployeed or underemployed. unfortunately, more regulations are on the way. specifically today, mr. speaker, we are speaking about the securities and exchange commission and the department of labor who are headed toward proposing two massive and inconsistent rule makings. they're going to hurt the ability of retail investors to get financial advice that they need for their portion of the american dream. mr. speaker, retail investors are not big-time professionals on wall street. retail investors had no role in causing the financial crisis. and they should not be punished for it which reglet -- which regrettably this rule making could do. rather retailers are hardworking citizens from our congressional districts who buy an
the copy cat effect is educating the next shooter that may be looking for a public venue and now understands if they ultimately decide on an airport, now i have learned how this case happened and how it ended up and that's really intelligence for the next shooter. >> stand by lou. i want to ask mary ellen one more question. we talked about the kind of person. you are a profiler. people, many people get upset when you say the word profile. there are profiles for all different kinds of criminal activity. who should we be profiling in this instance? is it young, white guys in their 20s and 30s, ethnicity, behavior, what is it? >> i'll answer like this. this is a genuine response. we don't have a profile of one of these offenders. right now, the number of cases is small, which is a good thing. you can't use traits that occurred in the l.a.x. shooting and make them predictive for the next shooter. having said that, we know there's a small group of people that already are developing these ideas of wanting to carry out these extreme acts of violence and lethality against people. along t
>>> a fort finds child care is more expensive than a college education. the nonprofit group child care aware says the cost rose 3% nationwide. the report says day care is now more expensive in nearly two thirds of the country than yearly tuition and fees. massachusetts had highest costs, at 16,500s aids year. california ranked 9th at 12,000 per year >> it's a lot of money. >> twitter raises its ipoz black berry gives up trying to find a buyer. >> emily chang is here now with this afternoon's after the bell report. hi, emily. >> good afternoon, just days ahead of it's expected public debut, twitter raised the price range from stock offerings planning to sell shares at 23ss today $25 a piece, up from an earlier range but that might not even be high enough. two people in the matter tell bloomberg the deal is several time oversubscribed black berry efforts to sell itselves to fallen apart the company will try to raise # million in financing the struggles don't end there the current ceo left the company and will be replaced by form former -- john chen. >> in honor of the faa's approval for in fli
to the future, we need to make it stronger by improving worker training and education, upgrading our infrastructure, and growing our manufacturing base. the truth is, there are additional things we can add and do to make america even stronger as a magnet for investment. before talking about what make ours economy such an attractive place to invest, and what we plan to do to make it even more atrabtive, i'd like to start by saying a few words about the state of the world economy. there's broad evidence of recovery across the global landscape. economic conditions, particularly in advanced economies, have improved, but there's no doubt that global command is not where it needs to be. in too many countries, unemployment levels are unacceptably high, especially among young people. as i said before, leaders around the world should make strengthening demand and creating jobs a priority to unlock growth that's robust, sustainable, and balanced. looking at europe, it seems the long recession is slowly fading even as critical steps have been taken to restore financial stability. this is good n
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> today senate homeland committee took a look at tragic naval yard shooting and security clearances. bipartisan group of senators working on a solution that strengthens that system. claire mccaskill has been one of the lawmakers leading the fray. floor, you have the first hearing ongoing and you've been pushing on this company, spinoff from the government that does most of the security clearances. there was a governm
, but more proud of title 9, 1973, this country came to make sure of equality for women in education and that includes sports. and the result is women in athletics that are amazing and entertaining. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. ellison: i congratulate them. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek wreck his? -- seek recognition? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to say thank you to a friend of mine, mayor james r. bobbing, who has dedicated 45 years of service to the city of granville in the second district. in the last 29 he he served as mayor. mayor bobbing has been recognized countless times for his leadership and commitment to west michigan. most recently he received the michigan municipal league michael a. guideo leadership and public leadership service award. in addition he serves as the chairman of the grandville council which plays a leading role in fostering public and private cooperation to enhance quality of
to build their system and educate the public. but there have still been problems. on the first day the site was so slow, the state took it offline to make adjustments to speed it up. there are still some technical glitches. every day are you finding new things on the site that need to be tweaked? >> yes, we're finding things all the time that need to be tweaked. >> reporter: on wednesday, washington state had to take its site down because the federal government system that verifies identities and income was not working. people had to fill out forms by hand. if the federal site was working just fine, would your site be up and running perfectly. >> our site would be up and running, yes. >> reporter: how well? >> we think pretty well. we're able to get enrollments through. we have places where people might get stuck. >> reporter: now, there are more than one million people here in washington state that are uninsured and the goal is to enroll 320,000 by january 1. but scott, so far, one concern is more than 80% of the people enrolling are enrolling in medicaid, meaning they're not paying into t
, potentially you're just not able to find a good-paying full-time job, perhaps you didn't receive the education that others have received, perhaps you have got some disability, you're -- you would go under this plan on medicare -- i mean on medicaid, and then everyone in between, the lowest income and the age of 65 is in a private health care system, which is a market-based system, competition driving prices down. the idea would be that there would be 20, 30, 40 health care plans in every state offered. people can choose what they want with a minimum, bronze, silver, gold plan with lots of choice. that is the promise, that is the hope, that is the idea, and the great promise of this is that if you have cancer, you can't be dropped. if you have diabetes, you can't be turned away. so when everyone is covered, the risk has spread, the price comes down and the free market operates. now, you would never know that based on the criticism that you hear on television and radio all day long, but that's the truth. one of the important components of that bill that many of us talked about was the fact that
, education and to create jobs so that everyone can live the american dream. americans deserve that. >> congresswoman barbara lee of california. thank you for your time. >> my pleasure. >> new surveillance video is showing a teen right before his bizarre death. coming up, more on his family's desperate search for answers may be recognized. >> and the man who with was about to jump off a bridge. in the nation, we know how you feel about your car. so when coverage really counts, count on nationwide insurance. because what's precious to you is precious to us. ♪ love, love is strange just another way we put members first. because we don't have shareholders. join the nation. ♪ baby... ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than
-- not laid out specifics he said he wants to fund education with federal money through possibly expanding medicare. both candidates agrow however they want to create jobs and grow the economy. >> my tax cut plan which will grow 58,000 new jobs and reduce the personal income tax the 5%. and the business income tax to 4%. >> my opponent proposes $1.4 billion tax cut and resoundly criticized. it will come right out of education. early childhood development, reform in the sols. teacher pay. investing in community colleges. financial aid at higher ed. i think that's the prudent way to do budgeting. >> i like those too. i like education. i like puppies. but i don't bring a puppy home. i don't bring a puppy home if i don't have a plan for how i'm going to deal with that puppy. or guess what my house is going to look like. and he's all puppy and no plan. >> reporter: so how are voters feeling four days out? we talked to some of them coming up in the next half hour. andrea and mike back to you. >>> thank you. >> the woman accused of vandalizing the washington national cathedral and possibly the li
and there is people all the time up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight
and back and forth. i appreciate it. i thank you for it. i would have had a great education, though, if you had kept me until the end, and i want to thank you and the ranking member for your leadership. we have appreciated it and admired it in our chamber, and also chairwoman stabenow for your effort and sustained effort in getting us to this point. i feel privileged as others have said to be part of the farm bill conference committee and join those who said this is the way we should should be doing our wn congress. this is the way we are going to be able to regain the confidence of the american people, not with the rock throwing and brick throughing and the screaming, but working together in a bipartisan, bicameral way, and that is the expectation of our farmers and ranchers. the farmers and ranchers in rural communities driving colorado's $40 billion agricultural economy, it is critical that we work through our differences to complete this process. mr. chairman, if i could sum up what i heard in the nearly 0 # listens sessions we've had all across colorado on this topic, the message is v
under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. the deep sweep power brush by oral-b for the first time. wow. it's "wow," you know? wow. wow. that feels "wow." [ male announcer ] oral-b deep sweep, featuring 3 cleaning zones with dynamic power bristles that reach deep between teeth to remove up to 100% more plaque than a regular manual brush. it seems like it gets more to areas of your mouth that you can't reach with a regular toothbrush. [ male announcer ] guaranteed "wow" with deep sweep from oral-b. #1 dentist-recommended toothbrush brand worldwide. >>> all right. welcome back to the "cnn newsroom." five things crossing the cnn newsdesk right now. number one -- passenger luggage is still in terminal 3 at l.a.x. after people dropped everything and ran during a shooting yesterday. a tweet from the airport today says passengers can get luggage left behind in other terminals, but not from terminal 3 just yet, where
exciting thing may an entire industry of lower-cost educational devices that every student has. now suddenly, you have education content among not from textbooks, etc. we obviously are very focused for jobs reasons and infrastructure reasons to improve our airports, roads, bridges. we need all that, and that is partly an idea of fiscal of our tax laws. we're working on that. keep our eye on the 21st century because that type -- one of the first mover jumps that the united states got at the end of the 1990's is our small businesses and entrepreneurs were using the internet first and foremost. that generated a lot of inventory improvement, and growth and productivity spur we productivity's bird we had -- productivity spurt we had. one of things i want to say, we are doing selectusa here, but we learn from other countries. we look at what south korea is doing on universal broadband for schools. we listened, when the president did his in sourcing for them, he listened to other countries why they chose another country on things that we could have done better, and it has affected what we
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. nothing says, "you're my #1 copilot," like a milk-bone biscuit. ♪ say it with milk-bone. why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away, if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. this is the age of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. >>> this could have been a disaster. i mean, under any other circumstances, it would have been a disaster, but 11 people, two pilots, nine passengers here, survived a midair collision at 12,000 feet. one of the pilots landed his damaged airplane, but the rest took parachutes. they pulled the chute, that included the pilot of plane number
, and believe it or not, they also are seeing a lot of educated college educated people. carol? >> rosa flores reporting live for us this morning. >>> still to come in "cnn newsroom," remember this, the last u.s. bat troops to leave iraq? today there are new calls from iraq for a return to the u.s. military. they need help. we'll tell you more, next. the secret is out. hydration is in. [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. aveeno® help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. they're not usually this thin, this li
's handling of health care and education, many democrats simply ignored her. and they haven't continued to ignore their gubernatorial nominee. it's true that democrats were probably not ever going to win this race. christie is simply too popular, thanks in part to his definite handling of hurricane sandy last year. democrats could have prevented christie from the sort of massive victory that he could use as a springboard for a 2016 presidential run. christie's campaign has not even tried to disguise that they want to run up the margins in this race so they can tell every republican who will listen that the state who re-elected barack obama by 17 points turned around the next year and backed chris christie by an even bigger margin. democrats could have denied him that. they could have worked to keep buono close, to keep christie from gaining momentum, from a massive victory in a blue state. instead, christie has built a 33-point lead without putting up any real fight on the democratic side. and that could come back to haunt them once 2016 rolls around. joining me now is e.j. dionne, a "w
, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. rely on unitedhealthcare for their medicare coverage. if you're looking at your options, see why aarp medicare plans from unitedhealthcare could be right for you. as you know, medicare doesn't cover everything. that's why it's important to consider your choices. aarp medicare plans offer a range of options, including plans that help lower your prescription costs or let you enjoy extra wellness benefits. and all these unitedhealthcare plans are backed by a commitment to quality and service. call or go online today to find out more. with over 30 years of medicare experience, unitedhealthcare can connect you with the right coverage to help you enjoy a healthier life. millions of people have chosen aarp medicare plans from unitedhealthcare. so join them and see what these plans can do for you. call unitedhealthcare
are unacceptable. ceilings around the world that prevent education and health care and jobs and opportunity are equally unacceptable. than we're going to be about the business of making sure that those ceilings crack for every girl and every woman here and around the globe so let's get cracking! g go to a mattress g g go to a mattress g g store and essentially they just get sold something. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. before you invest in a mattress, discover the only bed clinically proven to relieve back pain and improve sleep quality. when we actually lower the sleep number setting to get the sleep number bed to conform to them, it's amazing the transition that you see with people. oh, that feels really good. it's hugging my body. they just look at you like you cured all the problems they've ever had. we hear it all the time: "i didn't know a bed could feel like this." oh yeah. during our veterans day sale, our queen mattress sets are now just $1299-our lowest price ever! save $400. plus special financing until 2015. the sleep number bed is mo
public and private investment in education r&d and infrastructure. over the last three years we've made real strides in reducing our deficit. we saved more than $12.5 billion. that's been unbalanced. about 70% has been from spending cut. 30% from revenue. we need to do more but we have do it, i believe, in a balanced way. we've heard from senators about the need to modernize the tax code and move toward real tax reform. while the committee can't get it done. we can move in that direction in a substantial way. making a modest cut of only 5% of the trillion dollars a year we spend through the tax code would make huge dent in the deficit. lastly, we have to don't make some reduction in direct spending. although i know that's the area taken the hardest hit. i'll insist on doing in a way that put a circle of production around around the most vulnerable and honoring our promises to seniors, veterans, and about to retirement to protect them from cuts. chairman rhode island i know, chairman muir ray. i'm glad we have come together. we need focus not on the area of disagreement but priority we s
, educate, engage on subject matters that we think are very important. they can be money in politics, climate change, the state of politics, the influence of power in america, and, like i said, the early mission was, you know, we don't -- we are reporting driven. as you look behind me, i don't know what you can see out there, but we have ten reporters in the bureau alone. we have reporters in other places as well, and, you know, we don't focus on commentary. we don't focus on a lot of local analysis. we do some of that, but mainly we focus on stories we find important, things that are in the news and report them out in a way that is unique and different that's what's happening in the rest of the media, or they can be different but important that are not getting the attention that we believe they should be getting. >> host: what do you think the status of investigative journalism is today for magazines? too many magazines that focus on opinion writing? >> guest: well, i think there's a lot less investigative reporting. i use that praise not in a pa -- pejorative way. the news room and
would probably go abroad were you can get free education, free medical benefits, and not worry about the racial issues. host: if it is free, who pays for it to? caller: not sure who pays for the listening to your program and listening to other countries , i would less stressed at least give them an opportunity. you mean denmark, right -- right?er: caller: denmark. host: monti has this point -- you can call in to join the conversation -- do you feel you have the opportunity to get ahead in america ayako from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. -- in america? from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. caller: it is hard to get ahead in america when asians are taking our jobs here and taking our jobs overseas. the media believes we need a bunch of schooling to get ahead. i think that is wrong. host: thank you for the call. looking at the comparison of the chart we showed you from 1952 -- james is next from grand forks, north to code up. you say you do not have the opportunity to get ahead in this country, why? i have to say no i have to say that is where i come from. , c-s
and the senate we have robust beginning farmer and rancher legislation that focuses on education and building the capacity for the future. it also does some smart things to have set asides in some of these programs to make sure a new person on the land can access those things. i would certainly encourage us to come together. we're very close on that. keep those programs in there. once again, that builds our capacity for the future. in looking at capacity for the future, the land is our truly great resource. our producers are some of the best stewards of the land. but just like in all other things, we need to give them the tools they need to preserve that land. we need to make sure that conservation title is fully funded and we look visionary on those working lands to make sure we're not making the choices for those producers. they have the right to make the choice that works best for them. but make it both economically smart and people have proven they will take advantage of that. i would like to compliment my colleague from south dakota, who has worked with us on sod saver legislation that i
by decade, who killed jfk? it's whoever america was afraid of at the time. >> great fun. great education. you know, i love the way you thought about it o. always great to see you, brad. congratulations on the book. >> thank you. >> we recommend it highly. >> it's available online and in book stores now. >>> up next the president holds a rose garden speech on the obama care disaster, he didn't answer any questions and he didn't take any questions and he didn't offer any solutions, we'll take up that in the chalk we'll take up that in the chalk when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals: help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. you know how painful heartburn can be. f
's certainly more educated. and none of their more intelligent. >> we had the fed in the 70's, 13 percent inflation. and -- is not necessarily caused by the fed, but it is true that until paul volcker comes in and says to let the mayor were going to squeeze inflation out of the system no matter how bad it hurts, we definitely had our rising inflation environment. that was pretty -- is a dark spot on the history of the fed. i am not mean to say in any way that central bankers are commissioned or the only view what is right. i'm just saying it is important to have the fed there. there is there really an alternative. if he say, well, if the fed were not there would we not have had an inflation in the 1970's? i don't know. john: what about alternative currencies, it can print the bill. the stossel bank in print, and people would choose. >> between. we went through a time like that in the united states. that is the way that it used to be. there was no fed. every bank printed its own money. as you might imagine, if you don't have an oversight authority and as a legal commitment to china focus o
? they're smarter now? >> i think they have learned. they are certainly more educated. i don't know if they are more intelligent. we had the fed in the '770s. we had 13% inflation. >> yeah, true. the inflation of the '70s is not necessarily caused by the fed. but it is true that until paul volcker comes in and says, look, we will skis in inflation out of the system no matter how bad it hurts, we definitely had a rising inflation expectations environment. that was pretty tough and dark history, dark spot on the history of the fed. so i'm not meaning to say, in any way, that central bankers are only doing what is right. i'm just saying, it is important to have the fed there and there's not really an alternative. you know. if you say, well, if the fed weren't there, would we have not had inflation in the 1970s? i don't know. >> what about the free banking. the stossel bank can print a bill and let's choose. >> that's the way it used to be, there was no fed. every bank would print its own money. the thing is, as you might imagine, if you can print your own money, a lot of people would p
. we want to eliminate, educate, engage on subject matters that we think are very important. they can be money in politics, climate change, the state of politics, the influence of power in america, and like i said, the early mission was -- you know, we are reporting driven. as you will see behind me, i do not know what you can see up there, but we have 10 reporters in this bureau alone. we have reporters and other places as well. we don't focus on commentary, we don't focus on a lot of political analysis. we do some of that. but mainly we focus on reporting stories that we find are important. they can be things that are in the news, and we report them out in a way that is unique and different than what is happening in the rest of the media, or they can be things that are totally different but are quite important, that are not getting the attention that we believe they should be getting. host: what do you think the status of investigative journalism is today for magazines? are there to me magazines that focus on opinion writing -- are there too many up magazines that focus on opinion w
things at age six. my father, i used to hear him say if you get a good education, you can get a good job. so it was important in today's town. many of our computers don't have a computer at home. they don't have transportation to get to where they are. kids that don't have access will be left behind. my name is astella at age 71, i took my retirement savings to create a classroom to bring high-tech learning to communalties in need. >> all right, let's get on board. >> astella's green bus is a mobile learning center. >> are you ready to get on the computers? >> i see the bus as being able to bridge that gap. >> it's not just a bus. it's a movement. we're going to go from neighborhood to neighborhood to neighborhood to making a difference. we still run into problems. that's why liberty mutual insurance offers accident forgiveness if you qualify, and new car replacement, standard with our auto policies. so call liberty mutual at... today. and if you switch, you could save up to $423. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> a busy week ahead. it kicks off with a big
, not extraordinary. we want this social entrepreneurship education that's hands on exposure to community issues to be mainstream, to be part of every high school student's experience. >> scott, thank you very much. disw ora -- zora, thank you. continued success as you move on. >>> muggy out there this halloween morning. good news, looks like it's going to be a warm day and generally dry for most of the trick or treaters. here's your day planner. but lunch time in the upper 60s. winds will gust at times to 15. could be just a breeze -- could be just breezy at times and that may have an impact on your costume. 74 at 4:00. shooting for a high of 74 degrees. trick or treat time 6:00 to 8:00. i know some of you will be out till 9:00 or later but generally 6:00 to 8:00, 65 to 70. that's the temperature range with a slight chance after shower, little bit of a breeze. best chance of rain will be west of interstate 81. we're seeing some rain already. the bulk well north and west of us. pennsylvania having more problems than us. a few sprinkles have made it toward the east and western panhandle. we've se
are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. became big business overnight? ♪ like, really big... then expanded? ♪ or their new product tanked? ♪ or not? what if they embrace new technology instead? ♪ imagine a company's future with the future of trading. company profile. a research tool on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. a researat any minute...orswim. ...you could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to happen. check your credit score, check your credit report, at experian.com america's number one provider of online credit reports and scores. don't take chances. go to experian.com. >>> welcome back to "new day." happy halloween. apologies all around. the white house taking responsibility and defending itself. the president als
to entertain you but to educate and teach, call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. you're only as good as your most recent quarter in this game. nothing you've done before seems to matter. your whole body of work means nothing. it's worse than that. even though you may have made fortunes for your shareholders, even though you have oodles of cash in the bank, you're still unworthy in the eyes of some, and that's the story of apple which reported very good numbers after the close and after an initial dip, kind of hiccup, rallied nicely. frankly, i think it should have been up even more given the strength of the balance sheet and the improvement in gross margins which is what i was looking for. on a day when the dow drifted lower, nasdaq declined .08%. it was refreshing to see apple shake off the blues and power higher! >> house of pleasure. >> in a huge afterhours swing as the company made it clear, intraconference call, always wait for the conference calls, that things are, indeed, better than most expected. apple's earnings aren't the only ones that matter today. a dramatic run in all of the companies tha
. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. he was a matted messiley in a small cage. ng day. so that was our first task, was getting him to wellness. without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. from contractors and doctors to dog sitters and landscapers, you can find it all on angie's list. we found riley at the shelter, and found everything he needed at angie's list. join today at angieslist.com i wanted to ask you a couple questions.card. i've got nothing to hide. my bill's due today and i haven't paid yet. you can pay up 'til midnight online or by phone the day it's due. got a witness to verify that? just you. you called me. ok, that checks out. at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card with payment flexibility. so you want to drive more safely? of smart. stop eating. take deep breaths. avoid bad weather. [ whispers
a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. i gotta go deposit a check, transfer some money. so it's your uncle's turn. what? wait, wait, wait... no, no, no, wait, wait. (baby crying) so you can deposit a check... with the touch of a finger. so you can arrange a transfer in the blink of an eye. so you can help make a bond... i got it. that lasts a lifetime. the chase mobile app. so you can. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, it helps pick up some of what medicar
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